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xombiedirge:

Robots and Donuts by Eric Joyner / Tumblr

unexplained-events:

Walls of Writing

A mysterious author somewhere in Chongqing, central China has written an entire story on the walls of this abandoned house. The story is about a Kung-Fu super-hero and his adventure. No one knows who or where the author of this story is. 

He describes the super-hero in one line as: “I was 17… I have reactions like lightning, hearing like a bat, my vision is like a hawk, and I am as strong as a general.” -[X]

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backwrdblackbrd:

Portraits I

by Sarah Gonzales on Behance

asylum-art:

This Organic Skyscraper Is Designed To Literally Grow As Its Residents Recycle

The architecture giants at Agence Chartier Corbasson have imagined a design feat worthy of a green future.

Their new, London-based conceptual project, “Organic Skyscraper,” proposes a high-rise building built from the recycled materials of its residents. The building would essentially “grow” vertically as inhabitants discarded waste like plastic bottles and paper, their garbage turning into insulated panels for floors to come.

subtilitas:

Antonio Monestiroli - Cemetery, Voghera 1995. Photos (C) Marco Introni

erikkwakkel:

Medieval dachshund - Or: drawing with words

Here are three examples of a technique called “micrography”: decorative scenes that are drawn with words written in a tiny script. While there are examples from Latin books made in the West (here is one), the technique is particularly common in medieval Hebrew manuscripts. The drawings are usually found in biblical manuscripts and they appear to be commentaries to the text. The technique, whereby a scribe wrote in the smallest handwriting possible, goes back to the 9th century AD. The examples here, from the 13th century, shows just how entertaining the word-made drawings can be: they are an opportunity for the scribe to frolick in the margins of the page - like drawing a creature that looks like a dachshund.

Pic: London, British Library, Additional MS 21160 (13th century, more about the manuscript here). More about micrography here.

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